Ban on live animals’ use in education, research

Create: 04/17/2012 - 17:28

From now on, live animals will not be used for dissection
and other experiments in educational and research institutions. The Union Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) has banned the use of live animals
but scientists conducting new molecular research will be exempted from the ban.

Based on the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act (1960),
the MoEF has issued guidelines to the University Grants Commission, ministry of
health and family welfare, Pharmacy Council of India and the Medical Council of
India to discontinue dissection and experiments with live animals in
universities, colleges, research institutes, hospitals, laboratories and
instead use alternatives like computer simulation.

The MoEF says that the central government is duty-bound to
use alternatives to avoid unnecessary suffering or pain to animals.

The guidelines state that numerous alternatives in the form
of CDs, computer simulations and mannequin models are available; they are not
only effective as absolute replacements for animals in teaching anatomy or
physiology but are also superior learning tools in teaching of pharmacy or life
sciences.

"The animal experiments should be stopped in all
institutes except for the purpose of new molecular research. Sometimes, in
laboratories, a lot of work is repeated and animals become unnecessary victims.
Only scientists researching on a new molecular theory can experiment on
animals. In medical and pharmacy colleges, there is unwanted cruelty towards
animals which can be avoided. These guidelines mention imprisonment for five
years and monetary penalty," said Mangal Jain, a nominee of the
Institutional Animal Ethics Committee (IAEC), which is appointed by CPCSEA.

[Source: Times of India]

Comments

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

Way back in 2005, on the recommendation of Medical Council of India, Department of Pharmacology at Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, initiated a full-fledged and separate lab on "Alternatives to Animal Experimentation" with 20 computers. This is a first attempt in any medical college of India to have an exclusive lab where experimental work on animals is demonstrated by computer aided education. In the lab, response of drugs are demonstrated and taught by computer simulation exercises. In addition, students are given a manual and guide how to take alternatives to animal experiments in pharmacology.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

In every practical sphere India is lagging behind. The foremost is manufacturing. We have lost our internal car market, worth millions of crores of Rupees, to the Japanese and Koreans, although Korean car industry started in 1978 whereas ours started in early 1950s. Our weakness in invention, innovation and manufacturing are glaring. These hardware abilities cannot be replaced by computer simulation (software). We are very strong in software and computer simulation but our car industry cannot compete with the Koreans who are weak in software. In contrast our Biotech and Pharma companies are doing much much better. Now with this fiat of the ministry all liove animal research will stop and be replaced by computer simulation. If an animal is anesthetized before dissection, it feels no pain and this is a routine legitimate procedure.

The ministry should reconsider.

Prof Kunal Ghosh, Ex Head and Professor, Aerospace Engineering, IIT Kanpur.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

Demonstration of age old animal exp. for teaching must be banned. But for research in neurophysiology/ nutrition animal (Small) studies in behaviour and other invasive methods under expert supervision may not be banned

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

This is a significant development. I do agree that most of the animal experiments that we did as Medical Students way back in the 70s had no relevance and even today they are being conducted with no meaning. It is a very good idea to give it a permanent stop. However we have to now develop Computer Aided Learning Modules. Please clarify that in the light of the above if Animal House facility in Medical Colleges need not be created.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

This is ridiculous! Simulation is not an alternative for animal research. Without basic experiments, how one can simulate? As long as one takes care of ethical issues relating to animals, I don't think, it makes any sense for banning the animal research. Moreover, discriminating the animal usage for the molecular biology and in vivo experiments shows the lack of awareness and understanding on the basic science research concept by Mangal Jain. I totally understand the pain and sacrifice of animals for the understanding of research concept, however, it is inevitable to use them for the better understanding and also for the future therapeutics for both animals and humans.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

Something wrong. Earlier we used to see cells but now we see cell surface proteins. Computer programs and basic in vivo programs will differ in work and function. Computers cannot give live molecule reactions one can predict. American say that everything was discovered in chemicals, biomolecuels, cells and cell functions. But why and how new diseases arise? Still something to find what it is and are they? May require models.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

Should it be called a step to save animals from unnecessary pain or an awareness campaign among people? One is to understand it.Certain things to be kept in mind while passing such orders so that quality of education does not suffer at any stage.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

I honestly appreciate and understand the initiative of the Ministry of Environment and forests in banning the use of animals in life science courses, while saving the earth planet in principle. However, similar steps need to be taken to conserve fuel, petrol, light, electricity etc, which are at least as important as small laboratory animals, if not more. And what about killing of animals by butchers for selling their flesh and body parts. Several abusive substances need to be banned as well, which directly harm human systems. Furthermore, can we afford to discontinue animal studies for research work. Does this step point towards use of human volunteers for discovery of new medicines. All these points need to be carefully looked into.

Dr. Milind Parle,
Professor of Pharmacology , FIDE Rated Chess player, Chief Editor, Annals of Pharm. Sciences, Editorial Board Member for IRJP, Dept. Pharm. Sciences (Accredited by NBA), Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology (‘A’ Grade NAAC Accredited University), HISAR-125001 (HARYANA), INDIA. E-mail: mparle@rediffmail.com Mobile : 09812161998

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

I honestly appreciate and understand the initiative of the Ministry of Environment and forests in banning the use of animals in life science courses, while saving the earth planet in principle. However, similar steps need to be taken to conserve fuel, petrol, light, electricity etc, which are at least as important as small laboratory animals, if not more. And what about killing of animals by butchers for selling their flesh and body parts. Several abusive substances need to be banned as well, which directly harm human systems. Furthermore, can we afford to discontinue animal studies for research work. Does this step point towards use of human volunteers for discovery of new medicines. All these points need to be carefully looked into.

Dr. Milind Parle,
Professor of Pharmacology , FIDE Rated Chess player, Chief Editor, Annals of Pharm. Sciences, Editorial Board Member for IRJP, Dept. Pharm. Sciences (Accredited by NBA), Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology (‘A’ Grade NAAC Accredited University), HISAR-125001 (HARYANA), INDIA. E-mail: mparle@rediffmail.com Mobile : 09812161998

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

For the early detection of viral diseases in plants and humans, it is important to produce antiserum against a particular disease using live animals especially rabbits and rats. Now the ELISA test is highly useful for detecting HIV in humans. Hence the use of live animals may be exempted for such studies
Dr.R.Kannan
Associate Professor(Plant Pathology)

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

Dear sir,
While this is very good and positive development to ban live animals
in education.
Our company offers unique solutions like 3D stereoscopic
content/models of frog,insect,fish,cow,even complete human body where
one can see and feel as if the model is floating in mid air and can
simulate to dissect (as many times he wants),rotate,zoom or anything
which is not possible on actual live model.
Pl. visit us at www.disprovisual.com to know more about these products.
We offer complete hardware/software solutions which is quite
affordable and maintenance free.
Thanks.
Suresh Garg

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